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5/20/2015 7:36 AM
 
I understand the production/demand issue but just wanted to say that I would buy a coyote brown serape or a reversible coyote/ranger serape in a heartbeat!
 
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5/20/2015 2:44 PM
 
Hello gentlemen,

I thought I'd post a few photos and description of what I'm currently using for a 3 season "sleep system". This doesn't cover shelter, either made from material at hand or tent / tarp set-ups (tarp is my typical go-to). It does offer excellent coverage and seems to be made up of the right components to keep me comfortable during the seasons I typically am out to enjoy. The three pieces of gear are a REI Flash sleeping pad, a Hill People Gear Mountain Serape (multi-cam), and a surplus German Army Gor-Tex bivy bag (flecktarn camo pattern). It packs down nicely, though I imagine there are better and lighter pieces that I could find.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp1_zpsmvzjhajm.jpg.html]
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In the following photo I've included a 14oz can for size comparison:

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp2_zpssjqxrbwq.jpg.html]
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The Flash sleeping pad is very easy to inflate, with a designated valve for both inflating and deflating. Once fully inflated it offers 2.5" of padding and is very comfortable on nearly any surface I've slept upon.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp3_zpsubajymjf.jpg.html]
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It is a tapered mummy shape to help reduce size and weight, yet still provides full length / body padding.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp5_zpsniae6zpt.jpg.html]
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I use the surplus German Army bivy sack to wrap the HPG serape; the bivy being made of gortex helps keep the serape from foul weather or conditions.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp6_zps31mnaftz.jpg.html]
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The bivy sack was found on Ebay for the fantastic price of $45; though surplus I can't find any holes or other flaws. It offers ample room for nearly any sleeping bag.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp7_zpsernudyod.jpg.html]
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The HPG serape is a multipurpose piece of equipment, that be use as both insulated poncho or jacket and as a light sleeping bag. The serape has been designed with a zipper that allows for these three configurations. When used as a sleeping bag only the lower half of one side is zipped.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp8_zpsimklrb2c.jpg.html]
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To use all three together, I first insert the Flash sleeping pad inside the bivy bag:

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp9_zpsghiwxoqd.jpg.html]
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I use the serape in its sleeping bag configuration and lay it atop the pad, which has been inserted into the bivy:

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp10_zpszyzmuzqf.jpg.html]
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With the bivy zipped up and battened down, I'm well insulated, comfortable, and protected from the elements.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slp11_zpslban2vht.jpg.html]
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Again, I'm certain that many more experienced campers / backpackers have come up with better and lighter sleeping systems, but for now I find this to server well. I hope this was of interest!

Kind regards, Bill472

PS. by adding my REI sleeping bag, I could push this set up into a 4 season sleep system (but obviously it would add weight and bulk)
 
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5/20/2015 2:51 PM
 
I forgot to mention the following:

Total weight is just about 4 1/4 lbs, for all three pieces of equipment. The serape weighs the most: 2.5lbs, and with the bivy bag and straps the roll weighs in at 3 1/4lbs. Here's a quick shot of the bedroll - pad not included, which I did a quick job weighing with a luggage scale (not *super* accurate, but does a pretty decent job). The sleeping pad is the lightest of the three, weighing 1lbs.

[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slps1_zps32amj0rf.jpg.html]
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[URL=http://smg.photobucket.com/user/billyschorr/media/SLEEP1/slps2_zpselvfekit.jpg.html]
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Thanks again and kind regards, Bill
 
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5/21/2015 1:03 PM
 


just a dream but I'd like to see a kryptek nomad/mandrake reversible.

it would cover desert and woods and everything in between, sigh :-)

just a thought :-)
 
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5/21/2015 2:31 PM
 
since they didn't get selected for the mil contract, you're the very first kryptek request we've had. the little tiny bit of demand there was for it seems to have dried up completely.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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5/22/2015 3:31 PM
 

We've now got size medium Mountain Serapes in stock

 These differ from the original (large) in the following ways:

  • 7" narrower
  • 8" shorter
  • 5 ounces lighter

Other than those things, it's the same as the original. Price is the same because our cost is the same.

Which one to get? I sized the medium so it's right on the line for me at 5'10" and 220#. In greatcoat mode with the waist cinched, it is mid thigh length (will be nicely covered by the Mountain Parka instead of 4" below the edge of it). It's also noticeably less voluminous when worn this way. In sleeping bag mode with slit on the bottom, it still covers my body and to the top of the head. But there's not much tuck under the sides of my body and no tuck over the head. The original (large) tucks well under my body and well past my head.

For backpacking, I'll probably be using the medium. It's a little lighter and more compact and more manageable around camp. For my level 2 kit, I'll stay with the large. For an open ended situation like that where I don't have a sleeping bag I'll take better coverage for myself and more leeway to warm up two people at once over the smaller and lighter version.

If you're taller or broader than me, you want the original large version. If you're my size or smaller you've got a choice of either depending on your actual size and what you're trying to accomplish.

 


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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6/4/2015 8:49 AM
 
Went to REI yesterday and was a bit surprised to see a Serape on display.....oh wait it's not, someone just copied the design.

 
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6/4/2015 1:49 PM
 
I saw this as well, didn't think it reminded me of the Serape, except for hood. It seems more like a copy of the Sierra Designs Mobile Mummy, with the arm outlets and even down to the toggle that holds the lower leg portion up. I would say possible patent infringement, but who knows if the designer left the company and started evrgrn, similar logo to Sierra Designs. It appears to be REIs house brand. Not for the barrel chested it doesn't stretch well and a super tight footbox. I tried it on. Nice multitasker for a summer night in the local park or sleepover with smores in a camper. $ seems right, quality ok for mentioned use i guess. I wouldn't trust the material or waste the weight "outside the wire" with this, thats just me. I run the Serape religiously in the field over a down Sierra Designs 800 fill quilt (1.5 lbs.) as a temperature option, good for me in 30's- 40's. Summer and early fall - just the Serape (and clothes).

Theres a lot of stuff like this out there, and probably more to come. Options are always good, especially if theres more than one!! I think one needs to identify your load caring capability and weed out the crap and novelty and TEST what works and what doesn't. The Serape is the perfect Multitasker, and rarely go on any day+ trip without it.
 
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6/4/2015 7:42 PM
 

This is the way to go, IMO, esp. now that dri-down is available:

http://www.jacksrbetter.com/shop/sierra-stealth/

 You sew omni tape to the collar of a vest and keep the chill off with the hood

http://www.jacksrbetter.com/shop/down-hood/

 

You then have the option to use the hood while wearing the quilt poncho style (attatched to the vest/jacket OR the quilt, and attatched to the garment while using the quilt conventionally to sleep.

 
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6/5/2015 11:43 AM
 
Still waiting to see how dri-down shakes out in the real world. And mindful that down has no weight advantage over synthetic unless you're talking 800 fill power down.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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6/5/2015 12:31 PM
 

I'll second Evan's thoughts.  The respected and renowned sleeping bag company Feathered Friends shares this same sentiment.  Their bags, including the Winter Wren Nano that I own, instead relies on highly water repellent Schoeller Nanosphere fabric rather than dry-down.  So far, the Winter Wren has kept moisture out of the down very well.  I also know that the DWR treatment on the Mountain Serape is pretty danged good, too...I have worn mine in pretty heavy and steady drizzle and it shed water well.


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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6/5/2015 12:43 PM
 
evanhill wrote:
Still waiting to see how dri-down shakes out in the real world. And mindful that down has no weight advantage over synthetic unless you're talking 800 fill power down.

 I figured the only way to find out was to try it.  That Stealth is a somewhat inexpensive way to do that, and unlike a sleeping bag, if the down "dies" it is fairly easy to open a side seam and replace it.

 
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7/31/2015 12:31 AM
 

The MS has been good to me so I'll give you my input. Its in my top 5 favorite pieces of kit. Used it a lot in snow flurries and cold nights. Some of those nights were 10-20 degrees. It was good then, albeit I was wearing gortex too. In the summer, I just sleep in it in great coat mode so I can keep my boots on. A full chest rig even wears well over it.

Iused rubber bands and a poncho to augment on wet snowy nights. Rubber bands about every 10in to turn it from half zip to a quazi full zip and rubber bands to secure a poncho to it the same way. Just balling little bits of material like buttons and banding em'.

Buttons. Thats what I think would really improve an already awesome thing. Like about every 8-10in picking up where the zipper leaves off. This would help keep the bag on my torso if I move while sleeping, and wouldn't get in the way during other modes.

What else would be totally rad, is a proprietary water proof pocho that could be buttoned in like a bivy sack. Or a pocho designed around the MS.

Regardless, thanks for a most awesome piece of kit. also, my Snubby has atleast 1500 foot miles on, and except for its current horrific stench, it shows no wear.

 
New Post
8/5/2015 1:57 PM
 
Thanks for the feedback ruckflop. Are you placing the zipper directly underneath you when used as a half zip sleeping bag?

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/9/2015 6:35 AM
 

I’m really liking Dri-down.  I’ve been using a Sea-to-Summit 800-fill bag that unzips fully to serve as a quilt, perfect for the hammock.  The big advantage is in areas of high humidity like we have in the SE.  I still get concerned with condensation and when I go to ground or more primitive shelters, the Serape is still the #1 choice.  What’s better for really cold weather is my own personal “MSS”.  I can use the Serape as an “over-bag” with dri-down bag and then if really cold or severe weather include the heavier Gore-Tex bivy or my lightweight Ti-Goat Ptarmigan bivy.

 

I’m pretty sold on the dri-down and its performance so far.  However, that bag is dedicated for backpacking where I have a decent shelter. If I’m going to be more exposed or more primitive shelters, the Serape is much more durable simply because of the construction and synthetic down; I baby my dri-down bag yet I know I can abuse the Serape.  This combination has proven pretty versatile for me.

 



 

ROCK6

 
New Post
8/9/2015 1:32 PM
 
I used a very similar set up during last year's Hill People Gear Winter Gathering. I used a Feathered Friends Winter Wren Nano with a Mountain Serape as an overbag. I also had a Western Mountaineering vapor barrier liner along if it would have gotten cold enough, but the Shepherd Stove kept my tipi nice & cozy.
The Mountain Serape is just such a versatile piece of kit.

Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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8/9/2015 2:43 PM
 
Is the Multicam version reversible to the coyote brown color if looking for a less tactical appearance?
 
New Post
8/9/2015 6:58 PM
 
e.linck wrote:
Is the Multicam version reversible to the coyote brown color if looking for a less tactical appearance?


The Multicam version really isn't meant to be reversible, as that the outer shell has a DWR treatment. If you're looking for a less tactical version, the Mountain Serape is also available in solid Ranger Green.

Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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8/10/2015 11:18 AM
 
No matter if they are on the inside or outside the shell materials, Ranger and MC, are DWR treated so from that standpoint they are reversible. The issue is that the insulation is quilted to the shells on the inner layer so that you will have even seams on that side, which makes it a bit less water resistant. The other issue is that if you go inside out the waist drawstring and hook will be on the outside. So while it is not really designed to be, in reality it works just fine that way although due to the seams it will be a bit less water resistant as I said.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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9/15/2015 4:27 PM
 
Well, i'v had my serape a good while now and i'm still lovin it

I decided it needed a wash a while back so as a test i stripped off donned the serape got in the shower. It took absolutely ages to wet through!.....using it as i am this thing will never wet out on me in actual use


What promted me to comment here is just to add another vote for an ultralight poncho from HPG that really works well with the serape. something along the lines of the jervan bags could be amazing.
 
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