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6/25/2012 1:25 PM
 

graph paper will set us free!


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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6/27/2012 4:40 PM
 

 What colors will these stuff sacks come in?  Will their availability coincide with the Serape release?

 
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6/27/2012 5:48 PM
 

CP,

The stuff sacks will most likely be the color of the below Sil pack bag.  No word yet as of a release date.

 

 
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6/27/2012 5:53 PM
 

 That was my hope.  I like that color.  Your line continues to impress.

 
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7/29/2012 12:08 PM
 

Recently, a couple fellas I regularlyy hang out with and I spent several nights out with Serapes(HPG MS).  This is a field report regarding the performance of the HPG MS under what we call summer conditons, in these cases, under the stars.

Condtions:

Northern Rockies

5,400 ft elevation

Min temp - about 50 degreees f(+ or - a little)

Winds, down canyon, max of 10-12 mph, as low as 0-3, sustaining all night

Clear skys, few clouds

Cover - none, no tarp, tipi or tent, nothing to block the wind except the HPG MS

Insulation between people and ground   -  r5+

Arrrangement - HPG MS zipped up, with zipper under occupant, on top of pad/insulation

Occupant clothing -  cotton T shirt, shorts, merino wool balaclava(Smartwool[SW], pretty light weight, estimate 200g)

Occupant "sleep warmth rating"(subjective) -  sleeps pretty warm, all four seasons

Actions:

Slept under the stars

Observated great sky action

Used HPG MS as described in other posts about "cowboy" over night arrangements, late night "snooze in chair waiting for REI sale", trying out "EDC, always with us, overnight kit"and other uses  -  minimalist load out, quick set up, tear down

Outcomes -great night out, no hassles, stayed warm using set up listed above.

Lessons learned/reinforced  - 

For about 6 -12 weeks a year(depends on the year) this is a very functionable, easy to work set up.

Head cover is effective.  Took the SW bala off for a period, immediately felt cooling.  I suspect the night would have been less comfortable without the head cover.

Ground insulation was an important part of the comfort of the arrangement.  Moved off the pads for a period.  Felt the cooling immediately.  Same remarks as above.

Action plans -

More overnights under the stars with minimal gear

Refine sleeping pad arrangement - still looking for the perfect pad - durable, large - 25" x 75" min, warm enough, light and compact(interested in the experiences and opinions of others)

Refine sleeping clothes - consider lightweight merino wool for same temps, and consider clothes to take the HPG MS to lower min temps as opportunities present

Keep reading about what's working for others.

Thank you,

112Papa

 
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8/2/2012 10:25 AM
 

Hey All-

I just got back from a 5 night/ 6 day trip in Quetico (Canada adjacent to BWCA). 4 of us on the trip used Hennessy hammocks. One Scout, two Expeditions and one Explorer Deluxe. Being a VA guy and seeing that the lows were only forcasting to the mid 50's I decided to take the Mountain Serape as my sleeping bag.

First time using a hammock (Explorer as I am 225lbs with shoulders) and on night one I slept in the hammock with just the MS. Temps down to high 50's and I slept like a champ.

The next night was a wonderful evening and we all went to sleep with the fly's wrapped up. We woke up around 1230AM with thunder and lightning moving in rapidly. In the dark I got my 15 yo's fly down and thought I had mine positioned properly. We went back to sleep and the storm hit about 15 minutes later with wind and rain. The storm did not stop until 0800 that morning. Around 0230 I woke up feeling wet. I had partially inflated a Big Agnes sleeping mat as I had read that helps with the cooler temps in a hammock (it does, 48 degrees that night). I thought maybe the ridgeline for the hammock was leaking even though I had snakeskins and a fly. I felt under my pad and there was some pooled water. Being the lazy guy I am I simply decided to sacrifice part of the MS to soak it up and went back to sleep. Note: I used the MS as a blanket or top quilt type covering all week, never zipped it up. Anyhow, I got a little chilled from the waist down as the night progressed but the MS stayed warm even when damp. Even when shoved into approx. a cup or two of water it never really got soaked. When I woke up the next morning I discovered I had pulled my fly up too far towards my head pretty much leaving an open window from my calves to the end of the hammock for rain to blow in.I hung the MS up to dry once we got to our next camp that afternoon and it was dry as a bone in a couple of hours. For you hammock guys I also deployed the Hennessy Hex Fly for the rest of the trip although all 3 boys in hammocks stayed dry the night of the storm.

I thought the Mountain Serape worked great for what I used it for. In hindsight, I should have zipped it up on the sub 50 degree nights to see if it kept me warmer. I woke up due to being cold a time or two on those nights. FWIW I paddled and slept in a pair of nylon shorts and a nylon T shirt, barefooted, every night. On the morning it was 45 degrees I did pull an Arcteryx Atom out of my stuff sack and with it on, slept just fine. Had I brought the long underwear I left back at the car and worn it at night, there would have been no problems. I also was able to shove the MS, 6 MSR stakes and a Hennessy Explorer Deluxe with fly in snakeskins into a 21 liter REI sil compression sack.

 
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8/2/2012 10:51 AM
 

VA,

That was my problem with the HH too.  They are great beginner hammocks, but the way they like to integrate the fly onto the ridgeline makes for gaps that rain will always find.  I took to using seperate cordage to tie the fly to the trees directly, but it was still less than desireable.  I did however ride out the effects of a tornado that passed a couple miles away on the AT in Georgia in a Hennessy.  My wife did too and she stayed dry.  I wasn't so lucky and had to sleep on the wooden floor of the nearby trail shelter next to the loudest snoring through hiker in the history of mankind.

 
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8/7/2012 4:34 PM
 

Gentlemen - I have a Kifaru woobie, does anyone have one that they can offer a comparison between the mountain serape and K woobie?  I am talking about warmth and weight, I know the MS outclasses the woobie in terms of versatility.  I am a complete HPG convert.

 
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8/7/2012 4:46 PM
 

Craig Robertson wrote

Gentlemen - I have a Kifaru woobie, does anyone have one that they can offer a comparison between the mountain serape and K woobie?  I am talking about warmth and weight, I know the MS outclasses the woobie in terms of versatility.  I am a complete HPG convert.

Well, I traded my Mountain Serape (thought the new ones would be available sooner - oops), but I had one and also have the Kifaru Woobie as well. They're not really comparable items in a lot of ways, but if you're looking strictly at warmth and weight:

The M.S. is considerably heavier than the Woobie - by about 14oz IIRC, and doesn't pack near as small. I can fit either in a Kifaru Large 3-String stuff sack, but the Serape will be stuffed to brink whereas the Woobie fits pretty easily and compresses very small. I haven't slept with either item outside more than a handful of times (although I sleep with a Woobie/Doobie every night at home) so bear that in mind. That said, my impression is the Woobie is a little bit warmer, though not drastically so. I can't say for sure, but I think the quilting on the Serape might be a factor... it just seems to let cold leak in more than I've experienced with the Woobie. My understanding is the Serape v2.0 eliminates the quilting though so that may even things up a bit.

If I just wanted a blanket that was relatively lightweight and warm and I wasn't bringing my down JRB quilt, the Woobie would be my choice. The strength of the Mountain Serape is the versatility and that it replaces a jacket AND adds a sleep insulation layer, either alone or to boost a sleeping bag rating. That's why I owned both and will in the future, when the M.S. is available for sale again 

 
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8/7/2012 5:00 PM
 

Good info Jloden. Thanks for posting that.

One thing to keep in mind is that there is a pretty significant dimensional difference between the Woobie and Mountain Serape. That accounts for much of the weight and bulk difference between the two. The rest of it has to do with zippers and such. No free lunch.

The insulation itself on the Mountain Serape (primaloft) is warmer per weight than the insulation on the Woobie (climashield).

You are correct that the outer layer will not be quilted but the inner layer will. The quilting is necessary for longevity on primaloft for sure, and is helpful on climashield. That should remove any cold spots due to sewn through quilting.

I'll really be interested to see how the new generation (fingers crossed for pre-orders starting in the next day or two) compares with the old generation of MS when it comes to warmth.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/7/2012 5:04 PM
 

Thanks very much mate, I was thinking along those lines too.  My issue with the woobie was using it inside my Kifaru sleeping bag at below -10F when it slides around and your feet stick out.  Can't beat the weight and size, its the 'slickness' which I have always disliked about a ranger blanket.  I am not yet fully convinced the poncho/jacket/bag is right for me, except as an overbag.  I am going to toy with it for a wee while longer as I am off in Sep for two weeks in the bush.  Going to use my jungle light bag and woobie to see how warm I can make it.

Thanks again.

 
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8/7/2012 6:40 PM
 

evanhill wrote

Good info Jloden. Thanks for posting that.

One thing to keep in mind is that there is a pretty significant dimensional difference between the Woobie and Mountain Serape. That accounts for much of the weight and bulk difference between the two. The rest of it has to do with zippers and such. No free lunch.

I was going to mention that as I thought I remembered the M.S. as being larger, but the listed specs are actually showing the Woobie as 93" x 64" versus 88" x 66" for the Serape. Is that right, or am I missing something a out how they're measured or something?

 

 
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8/7/2012 7:40 PM
 

Ah... I'd forgotten they bumped up the length on the Woobie. It used to be the same length as a GI poncho liner.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/7/2012 8:49 PM
 

So the MS is a wee bit smaller but, slightly less compact and a wee bit heavier.  What I really am liking about the write ups on the MS is I can use it as a blanket or sleeping bag, which in a hammock is great.  Even in a normal bed, the woobie/ranger blanket always slides to the floor, being so slick.

Are MS (in coyote or foliage) going to be in stock by end of August?  I am off into the bush on exercise for the 2nd and 3rd wk of September and the more I think of it, the more I want to use it as my light bag possibly with my Snugpak Jungle bag.  Stuff sacks are coming pretty soon too?

 
New Post
8/7/2012 10:52 PM
 

Craig Robertson wrote

So the MS is a wee bit smaller but, slightly less compact and a wee bit heavier.  What I really am liking about the write ups on the MS is I can use it as a blanket or sleeping bag, which in a hammock is great.  Even in a normal bed, the woobie/ranger blanket always slides to the floor, being so slick.

Are MS (in coyote or foliage) going to be in stock by end of August?  I am off into the bush on exercise for the 2nd and 3rd wk of September and the more I think of it, the more I want to use it as my light bag possibly with my Snugpak Jungle bag.  Stuff sacks are coming pretty soon too

The Serape works great in a hammock, either alone or over another layer. That partial zip footbox is a godsend, even when ground sleeping. The M.S. is still slippery but when I used it in a bed it was not as bad as the Woobie/Doobie with sliding around, and with the footbox it's pretty much a nonissue anyway. 

 
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8/8/2012 10:51 AM
 

JLoden - thanks for the info mate.  I think the sale of another MS is going to be chalked up to HPG.

 
New Post
8/8/2012 12:22 PM
 

MS in ranger and multicam will be coming into stock this week on a pre-order basis. Folks who are on the email list will be getting notified first. To get on the email list, email info@hillpeoplegear.com. We're going to be getting about 10 a week (5 in each color) every week until we're adequately stocked up. This isn't our choice, it is as production happens. So getting ahold of one is going to be a little dicey initially until we've gotten all of the latent demand filled and have enough in back stock so we've always got them in stock. In case you've missed it, pricing for these 100% US made Serapes is higher than it was for the El Salvador ones we had before. $170 for ranger green and $190 for multicam. (pretty sure about the mc up-charge. I'll have to re-check that -- just passing our cost along on that one).


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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8/8/2012 1:58 PM
 

Evan - thanks mate and I never mind paying for quality, it means you probably never will have a need to replace it until its time to give it to my son.  I am on the the email list (I think - I certainly get the newsletters to my email.  How does one double check?)  Put me down for a ranger green one.  Are the stuff sacks a much later programme?

 
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8/8/2012 2:09 PM
 

Evan- Any plans for the US made in Coyote?

 
New Post
8/9/2012 11:14 AM
 

Stuff sacks shouldn't be too long. To be clear, the stuff sack of that size is sized for the back of a Tara, but will be a good one to use for the MS. My philosophy on stuff sacks is size them to the pack you want to use them with, not to what you want to carry in them.

Coyote US Serapes aren't out of the question, but are unlikely in the next handful of months.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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