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11/16/2016 11:08 AM
 
Bothy 

Hey y'all, 

In one of HPG recent videos, Late Season Summit Bag, Evan (I think?) was going through his gear he took for the summit bag. One piece of gear he pulled out was a bothy. I have never heard of this, or seen one. A brief search yielded a little information, and I get the general impression it is some type of emergency shelter, almost like a large bivy bag. Would someone be willing to perhaps explain (or point to an explanation) what they are a bit better, when and why you'd carry it instead of something like a bivy (light weight alternative for day hikes?), and maybe a few quality ones those who have them or have used them would recommend. 

- J

 
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11/16/2016 1:13 PM
 
2 Go Systems Trifecta or the SOL Bivvy in OD green are my go to.
 
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11/16/2016 5:30 PM
 
http://www.alpenglow.org/tech/zdarsky-tent/
 
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11/17/2016 3:48 PM
 
A bothy is a quick or hasty shelter, and the link huskyrunnr provided is a pretty good example. Alpndrms will have to jump on, but seems to me he learned about them during his Alps climbing days particularly in Bavaria. The idea being that you have a shelter for you and your gear and depending on sizes you and a buddy and both of your gear. It requires no putting up as you basically just pull it over the top of everything and then sit on the edges. Where it differs, significantly in my opinion, from a bivy is in the amount of coverage it provides. The bothy allows you to get everything covered, and a bivy only covers you. The bothy also allows you to work with your gear without it being in the weather, another failing of the bivy. I am not a fan of bivys simply due to that fact. They leave your gear out on in the weather and depending on what you are trying to do you have to be out in the weather too to do it, unless you are just chilling. For instance if I want to prepare a meal most bivys will leave my shoulders and arms exposed and everything in my pack that I pull out exposed too. If I want to change my socks most bivys will require that all of me is out of the bag in the weather. There are hybrids like the bivanorak that has arms and a hood that allow me to do stuff without getting out of the bag, and due to the bottom draw string I can also change socks while only exposing my one foot at a time, but even then my gear is still in the weather. That is why my bivanorak is largely left for times when I may be sitting in a single place for a period of time and want to me able to use my arms and what not like glassing for animals. In a lot of case folks will say well I just put up a tarp too, which means I have a dry work space. True, but it also means that are usually carrying more weight than a shelter which does all the above and gives you a fully enclosed space, that will give you a mico-climate due to your body heat. In either case you have to spend time putting up the tarp or the shelter. That is where the bothy comes in. It gives you the enclosed space for you and your gear out of the weather without having to spend time putting anything up. That is why I say hasty shelter instead of emergency. It comes into play when you want to get in out of the elements and don't want to spend time putting up a shelter due to time (either amount of time you are using it, or how quick you have to use it). That could mean you are in a mountain area that has a predictable afternoon rain shower for a period of time, and you use that time as a rest period. Throw over the bothy hang out until it is is over put the bothy away and roll on. Or as a way to get out of the wind and snow on a winter day trip for a lunch break, which can be a huge issue. Or if you get in trouble and need to hunker for a period of time.

As for source I know that Alpndrms can tell you right off where he got his, which is where Evan got his, but at the moment I can't think of it. I can say one is on my to get list for this winter.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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11/18/2016 7:22 AM
 
Thanks for the great explanation Scot, and thanks for the link, Huskyrunner.
 
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12/9/2016 12:46 PM
 
Has anyone made use of a crazy creek chair inside a bothy?
 
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12/9/2016 1:24 PM
 
Re: Bothy  Modified By alpendrms  on 12/9/2016 1:51:14 PM

Just happened to see this post.  The Terra Nova Bothy 2 is one of the items in the Umlindi-based Contingency Go-Bag we built for US DOJ folks.  I have the same model.  Evan has a Superlite model I gave him a couple years back.  The standard one has windows and a "socket" to allow the use of a trekking or ski pole to prop it up like a tent.  The Superlite model doesn't have the windows or pole socket. But it is significantly lighter because it is made of silnylon.  I bought mine from Backcountry Gear in Eugene, Oregon.  The Superlite model came from Summit Hut in Tucson, Arizona.  

Badger....I have not tried a Crazy Creek in one...but I will probably try that out tomorrow because I will be headed to the mountains to test out some skis and I will have both with me.

 


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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12/10/2016 10:43 AM
 
Hey Ken - thanks, I'll have to add one of those to my future purchase list. Definitely look handy for day hikes, especially compared to a tarp. - J
 
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12/21/2016 6:52 AM
 
I ended up purchasing a Bothy 4 from Back Country Gear in Eugene. A preliminary living room test shows that it's got a nice amount of room for myself, my girlfriend, and the dog, and probably our packs. It's definitely not ultralight, but it seems well built, and should work out nicely for a variety of emergency and non emergency situations.
 
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