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7/31/2016 9:50 AM
 

 

What do you guys think of the new knife? It's hard to get an idea of scale in this picture but the blade somewhat under four inches. All the knives will be A2 tool steel this time, and wrestling with what corrosion resistant over finish to use but it will mostly likely be Diamond Like Coating. It will be black or dark gray in color. They are't even heat treated yet but I'm getting really excited to get my hands on a finished product.

 
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7/31/2016 9:27 PM
 
Are you making them DKC?

How long is the handle? For me, on a 4 inch blade I want a full size handle that I can fit my size 2xl mitts around.

Also, for my general outdoor uses, I wouldn't want a sharpened back edge (even semi sharpened) it limits how you can apply pressure with the thumb on harder cuts.

What is the final grind going be? Full flat with micro bevel?

I am certainly not dissing this design, just pointing out what I have come to like.
 
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8/1/2016 3:07 AM
 
I am making them. It's hard to make a knife that pleases everyone. The handle is about 3 1/2 inches long, and I've very few complaints from people with large hands. That might be because the handle is quite wide, and would be even wider if it were wrapped. It's supposed to much smaller than the first knife I made as this supposed to be a piece of EDC. I made the knife so that it could be used with or without a handle. I'll probably keep two for myself. One without a handle for EDC and the other with handle for my Prairie Belt. If I'm carrying a small woodsaw, axe or larger cutting implement I don't like to be encumbered with a large fixed blade. It will be a V grind, that seems to be the easiest for most people to keep sharp.I also deliver the knife with an edge that some characterize as scary sharp. As for as the swedge, its not sharpened. I don't like a sharpened spine either as it chews up batons when the knife has to be beat through a larger piece of wood. The swedge doesn't chew batons up, and it creates a tip with less drag when drilling holes and processing game. I thought about making a few flat backed and I'm still wrestling with the idea. Thanks for your interest in it. I have a facebook page called Dayton Knife Consortium if you'd like to check out some of my other projects.
 
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8/1/2016 9:37 AM
 
Awesome!, I have always wanted to dabble in knife making and I admire those who do. I have found and am following DKC on facebook. You have some sweet designs.
 
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8/1/2016 11:49 AM
 
Hey DKC,

Nice knife! First I'd like to say that I've only once tried to make a knife and it ended up quite the failure. So any of my comments are simply from my personal preferences for uses, and I understand the difficulty and skill that goes into designing a knife and then bringing it to life. I also understand how much a knife is a personal preference and personal expression, so what one person likes or wants in a knife is often not the same as another person.

So with my disclaimer out of the way... I don't think I'd buy the knife. For a blade that size, the handle looks small. My go to small fixed blade is an ESEE Izula II, and its handle is just over 4". Its predecessor, the Izula, had a handle half an inch shorter and I never could take a shine to that handle. Especially with a longer blade, I would definitely want a longer handle. One 4" knife I use a lot in the woods is a Mora, with a ~4" blade and a ~4 1/2" handle, and even though its a cheap knife it is one of the most comfortable I've used. Like you said in your above comment, you haven't had negative feedback on it and you think it might be that its because of the width of the handle, but without personally holding it and using it, that's my impression.

I'm not a fan of swedges, false edges, or double bladed knives of any sort. Both aesthetically and functionally, they've never done anything for me.

The blade in general looks really wide. If the blade is about 4", it looks like its almost 1 3/4" wide? That might be great for extreme durability, but aesthetically it just doesn't look right to me.

Couple things I like - you have a great belly on that thing. It looks perfect for skinning or shaving. I like the handle design; I know I said I don't like how short it is, but if you were to add an inch on there I think it'd be awesome. The full tang that's been "skeletonized" looks good to me, and the pommel looks very well done. I also really like the jimping. Actually, now that I think about skinning and how I'd hold the knife, the handle might not be bad, especially if I was holding it how I do when I skin or do food prep. Hard to explain, but I pinch with the thumb and forefinger on either side of the blade. I'll just take a picture...

[URL=http://s257.photobucket.com/user/jkartzinel/media/IMG_1130.jpg.html]
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Your knife actually looks like it could be perfect for being used like this. I think I'd still want a longer handle so I wouldn't necessarily be limited to only using it like this though.

I like the edge you're talking about putting on your blade. I think creating a least a section on the spine of the blade that has 90 degree edges would be a good idea - I usually like to carry a ferro rod, but only two of my knifes (one a monster chopper, the other a 4"er) have spines that can strike a ferro rod.

Anyways, those are my thoughts, good and bad. There are definitely some things I like about it, but the short handle, wide blade, and rear swedge are things I think would end up killing it for me.

Best of luck man, and I hope my comments and criticisms are taken well. Its hard to really evaluate a knife without using it, so they're all just initial impressions based on my previous experiences.

-J
 
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8/1/2016 3:48 PM
 
Thanks for all the kind words guys. If you ordered one, didn't like the handle your money would be subsequently refunded in its entirety when the knife was returned to me in its unused state. Essentially there would be zero risk in it for you.

That being said If I was a car salesman I would be in the market to sell a guy that's 6' 4" a Scion. I the knife doesn't fit you it doesn't fit you.

I also have the original Izula, and I also thought the handle was a little on the small side. I wrapped it, and it fixed the problem by increasing the width and the thickness, not the length. But we might have different hand sizes.



 
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8/1/2016 3:59 PM
 
 
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8/1/2016 5:08 PM
 
I think you'll find from the pictures above that the handle is more in line with the measurements of the Izula 2, that is, if the Izula 2 is a half inch longer than the original. It also wider than both Izulas. I can also wrap the handle with any material and whatever configuration you think fits your hands the best. I don't plan on replacing your Izula 2, as you can see from the appearance of my original Izula I use it and carry it often, and find it to be an excellent knife.

I really don't feel the two knives are in the same class.
 
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8/1/2016 5:09 PM
 

Looks good. I think it could make a handy little skinner.

 

BTW, I love A2 for a knife. My favorite combination of ease of maintenance and edge retention.  

 
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8/1/2016 5:10 PM
 

 

This might give you a better idea of handle to blade proportion.

 
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8/1/2016 6:02 PM
 
Crewhea05, I fell in love with A2 with the first run of knives. It takes a lot to get it to rust as it contains some chromium, it holds an edge forever, is easy to sharpen, it's awesome. It's kind of a well hidden secret in the knife industry.

GoKarts I would also like to address the swedge. I understand that it's not your cup of tea but this knife may well ride on a plate carrier as well as a pack in the backcountry and concessions must be made. As for it being used with a ferro rod. Where the thumb ramp with jimping terminates on the spine of the knife creates an L shaped junction that actually provides two bearing surfaces for a smaller ferro rod. I won't know how well it works until the knives are hardened but this L shaped junction was by design and destined for that purpose. Plus you can use the inside of the handle skeleton cut out at the base to strike a ferro rod. I will leave it sharp enough for that purpose. Don't think I've left the woodsman in the lurch.

The blade width: well, the width of the blade allows it be used as a handstop so that the hand doesn't ride of over the blade when the knife is wielded in an ice pick grip. You must also consider that this knife is 3/16" thick. The blade was ground with the flat of the saber grind very high so that when bearing down on the handle, forcing the leading edge down a feather stick (for example) the user can get the blade very close to the material he/she is cutting and still allow for a full thickness 3/16" spine. I also like a knife that is as close to my knuckles as possible. When my hand is around that handle the closer the cutting edge is to my knuckles the more pressure I can exert on whatever I'm cutting. Also when I'm slicing something and that something is lying on flat surface (such as a block of cheese sitting on a table, for lack of a better example), the blade does a fair amount of cutting before my knuckles bottom out. There is method to the madness.
 
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8/1/2016 6:15 PM
 
It's a cool looking knife....personally, I like it from the photos...but yeah, I'd like to see a bit more blade and a bit more handle.
 
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8/1/2016 6:18 PM
 
Brother DKC, I don't do Facebook...so can you tell me your approximate price point?
 
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8/1/2016 6:49 PM
 

DKC:  First and foremost.....nice work.  It is truly something to put your soul and passion into a hunk of steel and wrest a usable tool from it.  I like A2 as well...one of my favorite steels from a user's optic.  I have an older Blackjack Model 125 (the poor man's Randall), and you are absolutely correct with the qualities of such steel.  Like several folks that have already commented, I too wouldn't mind seeing a wee bit more blade and more handle on this design.  That said, as it stands, I could see this blade finding a good home as a solid back-up and riding in a HPG Kit Bag.  Personally, I'm not a fan of an edge along the spine, but do understand your logic for having it on this one.  Is it not possible to have the same design without the spine edge?  Often times, I like to choke up far forward of jimping on a blade to make cuts, either with my index finger or thumb, in order to get a desired slice or gouge.  If the spine were kept at a sharp 90 degrees, the ability to spark a ferro rod would be preserved.  I do see how this knife could be very useful in the backcountry for small chores and for processing a mammal, foul, or fish.  It reminds me a little bit of a really nice "Patch Knife" (https://www.google.com/search?q=blind...) I bought from the now defunct Blind Horse Knives a couple years back...functions well as a Neck Knife, but has good application as a back-up to a primary, as well.  All in all, well done, and I hope it sells well for you!


Hill People Gear Coureurs des Bois (Brand Ambassador). Victoria faveat paratam. De Oppresso Liber.
 
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8/2/2016 3:06 AM
 
Again, thanks for all the praise and support. I've always been fascinated with small knives, and doing more with less. I've been able to accomplish some very large cutting chores with some very small knives. I guess the usefulness of a small cutting tool was kind of driven home when I began to read about the 5300 year old iceman Otzi and his equipment. Of course, there are many more options available to us today, and a small knife isn't always the answer but I wanted to make something with dimensions that allowed it be a constant companion, day in and day out. I wanted a knife that had as much utility as it could provide for it's small footprint. When you tread that ground you're bound to run into users that find it too small. The luxury of making my own knives is the next model can please the crowd that I'm currently interacting with. I would like to make an intermediate sized knife of similar styling.
 
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8/2/2016 3:20 AM
 

 

As you can see Otzi conducted his day to day cutting chores with a very small knife. That being said the same layout (skeletonized handle and all) could see an increase in length and still be quite carryable. I've seen some very large knives executed with skeletonized handles with good results. A Pohl Force Lima One comes to mind. It's much larger than I would go with such a design but it certainly represents a proof of concept.

 

 
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8/2/2016 2:45 PM
 
As far as a price point goes, I think we're looking at $240 for the knife, wrapped handle, Baltoron sheath with Bladetech TekLok. $210 for the knife with no handle wrapping, sheath and TekLok. That's a rough estimate, as I'm not 100% sure what finish I will be going with. I'm leaning toward DLC but I might do have the knives in DLC and half the knives in a nickle based finish. Not sure yet, and that might effect the bottom l line.
 
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8/5/2016 8:38 AM
 
Hey DKC,

Thanks for the very detailed reply. Its pretty cool hearing your thought process and how much you've really put into this knife. The pictures with the Izula were really helpful for me, putting the knife in perspective size wise. I can definitely see how it fits the size profile of the Izula, but due to its bigger blade it would fill a much larger role. Best of luck with it all.

-J
 
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8/21/2016 6:23 PM
 
So I worked up a flat back version, and it's growing on me a lot. I'll get some pics up soon. You guys can take a gander and tell me what you think.
 
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8/25/2016 1:46 PM
 
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