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5/24/2016 9:41 PM
 
One trick for CoBan,Koflex,VetWrap is to put a 'tail' on the working end with tape. It keeps the end from sticking to the roll and makes it easy to find the end under stressed conditions.

The other is to keep your rolls inside a length of PVC pipe to keep them from crushing into a worthless mess.
 
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5/25/2016 12:59 PM
 
Longeye wrote:
One trick for CoBan,Koflex,VetWrap is to put a 'tail' on the working end with tape. It keeps the end from sticking to the roll and makes it easy to find the end under stressed conditions.

The other is to keep your rolls inside a length of PVC pipe to keep them from crushing into a worthless mess.

 Or just fold a half inch under.  We call that the "buddy fold" - kind of the opposite of the blue falcon...

 
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6/2/2016 5:20 PM
 

Something else I forgot to add from earlier posts is having some anti-diarrhea meds on hand, along with max-strength Pepto Bismol chewables.  I'll usually carry some Immodium, if the Pepto can't sort things out after a few days.  ~ 60-65% of the cases of the dreaded "butt-rumblies" encountered are usually taken care of with Pepto.  Traveling overseas pretty often, it is going to happen sooner or later.  Out in the backcountry overseas, that case of the squirts can become downright serious, because you can dehydrate rather quickly.  

Evan....love the Tool Roll IFAK!

 


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6/2/2016 6:17 PM
 
alpendrms wrote:

Something else I forgot to add from earlier posts is having some anti-diarrhea meds on hand, along with max-strength Pepto Bismol chewables.  I'll usually carry some Immodium, if the Pepto can't sort things out after a few days.  ~ 60-65% of the cases of the dreaded "butt-rumblies" encountered are usually taken care of with Pepto.  Traveling overseas pretty often, it is going to happen sooner or later.  Out in the backcountry overseas, that case of the squirts can become downright serious, because you can dehydrate rather quickly.  

 

 

IME, Lomotil (diphenoxylate) works a bit better than Immodium.   It requires a script here, but you can often buy it OTC overseas.  Don't go overseas without six 500mg pills of Ciprofloxacin.  If your "green-apple-quickstep" turns truly horrid and doesn't respond to the Lomotil in 24hr, start the Cipro twice daily until its gone ( 3 days).  If your still pooping liquid, then you'd better find someone with a microscope who knows how to use it to examine your poo.  A centrifuged sample via a formalin-ether float is the gold standard.
 
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6/2/2016 7:06 PM
 

Already carry Cipro and a few others.  Didn't just fall off the 300F1 truck yesterday and have dealt with some illnesses of teammates and indig more than a few times.  The intent for this thread is for backcountry folks to be able to carry easily procured items for CONUS and the occasional trip outside our borders.


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6/2/2016 10:09 PM
 
alpendrms wrote:

  Didn't just fall off the 300F1 truck yesterday

 

That means you're pretty friggin' old :)
 
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6/3/2016 4:49 AM
 
Take-a-knee wrote:
alpendrms wrote:

  Didn't just fall off the 300F1 truck yesterday

 

That means you're pretty friggin' old :)

True enough, I'm getting a bit longer in the tooth.  I can still hang....just can't go quite as fast as I used to.  I prefer this saying: "Beware of an old man in a profession where men usually die young." - Hans- Christian Ströbele.


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6/3/2016 12:54 PM
 
alpendrms wrote: I can still hang....just can't go quite as fast as I used to.  I prefer this saying: "Beware of an old man in a profession where men usually die young." - Hans- Christian Ströbele.

 Nice.  I hung out near the Smoke Bomb Hill gas station myself.

 
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7/6/2016 10:11 PM
 
evanhill wrote:
Tincture of benzoin is found in the WMI wound closure kits to be applied before the tegaderm. Gotta make sure I got some into my homemade kits. Honestly I don't remember.

Duct tape works pretty doggone well, but I've had issues with it staying applied.

I used some tincture of benzoin on myself a couple of weeks ago just to see how it did (practice). It seemed to hold leukotape on pretty darn well, and would have likely done an even better job if I had prepped the skin with an alcohol swab before hand. REI sells little vials of it that are pretty compact/lightweight. I am sure they can be had elsewhere for cheaper, too.

Evan, what size Tagaderm dressings are you carrying both for blister and for deep wound?

Another addition that I've made to my first aid kit are a couple of packets of oral rehydration salts. I figure they're pretty cheap and lightweight, and if nothing else can be ingested in the event that I can't eat for some reason. 

 
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7/7/2016 3:58 PM
 
SuperBadger wrote:
evanhill wrote:
Tincture of benzoin is found in the WMI wound closure kits to be applied before the tegaderm. Gotta make sure I got some into my homemade kits. Honestly I don't remember.

Duct tape works pretty doggone well, but I've had issues with it staying applied.

I used some tincture of benzoin on myself a couple of weeks ago just to see how it did (practice). It seemed to hold leukotape on pretty darn well, and would have likely done an even better job if I had prepped the skin with an alcohol swab before hand. REI sells little vials of it that are pretty compact/lightweight. I am sure they can be had elsewhere for cheaper, too.

Evan, what size Tagaderm dressings are you carrying both for blister and for deep wound?

Another addition that I've made to my first aid kit are a couple of packets of oral rehydration salts. I figure they're pretty cheap and lightweight, and if nothing else can be ingested in the event that I can't eat for some reason.


Tincture of Benzoin works great...just be cautious of using it in or at the very edge of a wound....caustic to dermal tissues and your patient will certainly let you know it! For the rehydration piece, a couple other good choices that I have fared well with in hot jungle and bush environments are Hammer Nutrition Endurolyte capsules and Hammer HEED packets. Both carry well, last a long time, and definitely help stay ahead of the electrolyte replacement curve.

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7/7/2016 5:05 PM
 

Thanks for the heads up regarding the proximity of tincture of benzoin to wounds.

I've begun to carry a few packets of HEED after learning about it from you and the Hill brothers. I love that it's low on the sugar content and has a mild taste. I've been meaning to pick up a bulk supply of the packets at some point. 

My backcountry kits are currently getting a long needed re-assessment and re-fit, so I've been going back to various forum threads. 

 
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9/15/2016 10:31 AM
 
Anyone carrying a contingency for poisoning in the back country? Specifically toxic plant ingestion for those that travel with kids or the ethnobotanically curious.
 
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9/23/2016 8:17 AM
 
OldFart wrote:
Anyone carrying a contingency for poisoning in the back country? Specifically toxic plant ingestion for those that travel with kids or the ethnobotanically curious.

 

I'm not carrying anything specifically to take care of poisoning with me.....just an EPIPEN for anaphylaxis.  I reckon carrying some activated charcoal wouldn't be a bad idea, and/or Syrup of Ipecac.

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9/23/2016 8:27 AM
 

During my recent trip to Peru, I also got good info from active duty Special Forces guys that joined us on our jungle trip.  Many Team Medics are now carrying and using the SWAT-T (stretchy wide rubber) tourniquet with excellent results.  This is the same TQ that Evan & Scot offer as part of the Dark Angel Medical HPG version IFAK.  They both carry them, and I've been carrying the SWAT-T as one of several TQs in my own kits.   The SF guys said that excellent levels of constriction can be applied to a limb over a wide surface area, and still preserve undamaged tissue surrounding a wound that is leaking arterial blood.  Hemorrhage control can be achieved with the SWAT-T very quickly and with less force than with other TQs.  Special Forces Team Medics have been using them in real-world combat environments to control many levels of bleeding all the way up to exsanguinating arterial bleeds.  Good to know that this device is effective to that level.  Additionally, the SWAT-T is very effective as part of a compression dressing or to secure a splint.


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9/23/2016 4:48 PM
 
alpendrms wrote:

During my recent trip to Peru, I also got good info from active duty Special Forces guys that joined us on our jungle trip.  Many Team Medics are now carrying and using the SWAT-T (stretchy wide rubber) tourniquet with excellent results.  This is the same TQ that Evan & Scot offer as part of the Dark Angel Medical HPG version IFAK.  They both carry them, and I've been carrying the SWAT-T as one of several TQs in my own kits.   The SF guys said that excellent levels of constriction can be applied to a limb over a wide surface area, and still preserve undamaged tissue surrounding a wound that is leaking arterial blood.  Hemorrhage control can be achieved with the SWAT-T very quickly and with less force than with other TQs.  Special Forces Team Medics have been using them in real-world combat environments to control many levels of bleeding all the way up to exsanguinating arterial bleeds.  Good to know that this device is effective to that level.  Additionally, the SWAT-T is very effective as part of a compression dressing or to secure a splint.

 

 

 

 
I'm not a fan of windlass style TQ's, been running RATS but I'll give the SWAT-T a look. Sounds like an all around better solution.

 
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9/23/2016 5:57 PM
 
Pourquoi?? They have saved countless lives.
 
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9/24/2016 2:31 AM
 

OldFart....I can understand your dislike of some windlass style TQs out there, when some are prone to breakage (like the older CATs), some being too slow (like the older SOF-T with the thumb screw), and also some not staying in the optimal "high and tight" location due to Velcro or the entire TQ becoming slick with blood.  That said, the newest GEN-7 CAT, the NATO, and the SOF-T Wide all work really well...but each have their own pros/cons/limitations.  So too, does the RATs and even the SWAT-T.  

I like the RATs as well, but it does have the issue of making sure to get enough wraps around a limb to achieve the critical 2-3 inches of surface coverage, in order to not compromise otherwise undamaged tissue and vasculature.  On a guy with really big limbs, that can be a challenge.  Even the SWAT-T can slip if it is covered in blood...so it's key to make sure enough initial wraps allow it to "bind" to itself and stay in place.  

All have their limitations, which is another reason for the "two is one & one is none" approach, and also ensuring to have all personnel possessing proper training on whatever TQs are employed.  Bottom line...as long as whichever TQ is being used is tight into the inguinal aspect of a leg or the axilla of an arm, that's the critical spot.  If one isn't doing the trick, a second TQ can be placed on the same limb right next to the initial.  Obviously, with any of them, you are fighting the clock.  Every second means a lot more blood loss.  We practice for a standard of less than 30 seconds for complete application.


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9/25/2016 10:14 AM
 
alpendrms wrote:

.  That said, the newest GEN-7 CAT, the NATO, and the SOF-T Wide all work really well...but each have their own pros/cons/limitations. 

 Yes. The Gen 7 CAT is great, vastly beefed up, with a BIG problem.  They re-designed the buckle to only have one slot to thread the tail through, this means the ONLY means of keeping the TQ in place is the velcro.  People HAVE to be trained to wrap the velcro fully and wrap the tail around the windlass and tuck it under the grey retention strap.  I still think its a great TQ though.

 NATO? Only if that is all you have, IMO.  The way they pinch/twist tissue when you wind them is a problem, IMO.

SOF-T Wide?  Great TQ, except putting one on with one hand can be difficult, and ONE-HANDED APPLICATION is the standard, as one hand may be all you have that works.  The older SOF-T (with the screw) had a little plastic triangular keeper at each end of the windlass, the new version only has one, and when the TQ is applied, one-handed, to your upper arm, it winds up being somewhere between difficult and impossible to lock the windlass, especially if you have any shoulder mobility issues.

SWAT-T.  Great product, but doesn't qualify as a primary TQ because it can't be applied one-handed.  It is about the absolute best thing going to beef up a TQ that needs a little distal reinforcement.  Another great thing about it is it can also be used as a pressure dressing wrap.  You can also cut off a section and tape it in place as a chest seal, or start a fire with it.  They are single use items, we use them in training until they snap in half, which eventually happens.

My take on tourniquets:

1) Lower extremity- SOF-T Wide.  It will generate more force than anything short of the old Ranger Ratchet, which IMO was dangerous in the hands of non-medics

2) Upper extremity- CAT- 6 or 7.  Easiest to apply one handed.

3) Supplement both with the SWAT-T rubber wrap.

 
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9/25/2016 10:20 AM
 
alpendrms wrote:

OldFart....I can understand your dislike of some windlass style TQs out there, when some are prone to breakage (like the older CATs),

 My experience is that this is an undeserved reputation.  I'm not saying that it hasn't happened, but, like an "un-reliable Glock", it don't happen too often.

 
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9/25/2016 11:18 AM
 
Take-a-knee wrote:
alpendrms wrote:

OldFart....I can understand your dislike of some windlass style TQs out there, when some are prone to breakage (like the older CATs),

 My experience is that this is an undeserved reputation.  I'm not saying that it hasn't happened, but, like an "un-reliable Glock", it don't happen too often.

I've seen it happen on two different occasions during management of trauma downrange.  TAK, does there really need to be a Glock analogy attached to everything?  Geez! 


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