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1/7/2017 9:49 PM
 

Greetings all,

I'm hoping to tap into some collective knowledge of the group here to help source a specific sleeping bag to pair with my newly purchased Mountain Serape. I'm looking for a lightweight, compact, wide sleeping bag (I have 46" chest and shoulders to match) in a neutral earth tone color (Multi-Cam ok). My intended uses for the bag will be a standalone bag in shoulder seasons or under a MS when temps require additional thermal regulation.

I'm currently using a Snugpak Jungle Bag which I've been pleased with, but the width specifically in the shoulder area leaves a bit to be desired @ 29.5" when laid flat. If I could get a few more inches in the chest/shoulder area I'd be a happy camper.

Any input or suggestions will be appreciated.

 

 
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1/7/2017 11:47 PM
 
The Wiggy's Freedom Shelter has a 34in width.  They have versions rated for 40F, 20F, and 0F.  If you don't want center zip, one of his outer bags for his FTRS system should work for you. You won't find a more durable bag.
 
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1/8/2017 11:27 AM
 
Not sure if you're up for quilts, or what price range you're looking into, but Enlightened Equipment makes some phenomenal stuff. I would measure your shoulder circumference before ordering one. My shoulder circumference is 58", and I definitely needed a wide, and an extra wide probably would've worked fine too. A 40F wide synthetic quilt is 19.5 oz,and a 40F wide down quilt is a scant 14.3 oz, and both come in 50F temps and are even lighter. They're custom made, and they have a lot of choices for colors, ranging from a camo that looks like MARPAT, and a really handsome coyote, and a couple shades of green.

I love mine, I picked up one of their 20F down quilts. So light and so warm. I have a so-called 0F bag that isn't half as warm as my 20F down quilt.

- J
 
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1/9/2017 9:35 AM
 
The answer for me to almost EVERY sleeping bag question is

Wiggy's.

If they don't make it, it is probably not needed.
 
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1/9/2017 5:25 PM
 
You also might want to look into Montbell's "Super Spiral" line--definitely a lot of give with their bags.
 
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1/10/2017 10:36 AM
 
Thank you all for sharing your thoughts and experiences on the topic!

I've taken a peek at each of the suggestions mentioned here and I am surprised I've not come across Wiggy's in the past. I was quite amazed at the diversity of their lineup and options available. I love that they aren't afraid to make a wide bag. Their bags while durable as all get out, do not seem to be very compressible which is something I consider as I try to keep my pack reasonably compact. Of their bags, the FTRSS (boat foot) 40ºF overbag is a possibility.

I had looked at Snugpak's Special Forces 1 bag, which is even more compressible and slightly warmer than my current jungle bag while having an extra 10cm circumference to the shoulder area. Based on how I fit in the jungle bag, the additional 10cm would probably do wonders for comfort even t hough it's not as spacious as the Wiggy's offerings. Snugpak also offers a extender panel that can be zipped in to provide a few extra inches. They also have a reinforced footbox that would allow me to keep boots on in the bag. Nice feature but not something I absolutely require.. Pricepoint on these is reasonable with some Google-Fu @ ~$110 USD.

I have long been aware of the cottage industries producing some very nice quilts, but I've been a skeptic. I've largely written them off in the past, probably more due to me being used to a mummy bag than anything else. Their weight, packability and versatility have grown on me as I spent a little time educating myself on the subject. I'm certainly entertaining the option of going with a quilt much more than I had prior to posting this question here. I especially like the price point they can come in for the insulation quality, weight, and packability you get. I'm going to take this option much more seriously than I had in times past. Thank you for the suggestion GoKartz.

Regarding Montbell's line, I'm familiar with them but didn't really look that closely at them due to the price point and suspicion they might not be as durable as others. I'm confident they'd meet my size requirements however. Do you or any others have experience with them in a "field" setting?

I've not yet made a decision, but options are still being considered and factored into the equation. I'll be sure to keep the group posted as to what I decide to go with and how it works out. My MS shipped yesterday so I'm eagerly awaiting that. Thanks Hill brothers for the quality kit and for the forum here.
 
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1/10/2017 10:53 AM
 
People love or hate wiggys. Their bags are known for being bombproof, but heavy and not compact. Lots of arguement over whether they are accurate to weight or not.

I just bought a montbell and started a thread. Short version, the 20 degree stated temp is off by about 30 degrees. I can't recommend them.

Check out Big Agnes. However, I continue to swear by North Face synthetics. They are accurate to temp, super cheap if bought off season, and I usually can find one big enough.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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1/10/2017 11:21 AM
 
Just DSM - I was iffy on them too, until I said WTH and gave it a shot. I would say if you're concerned about them not being warm enough, you could go 1-2 temp ratings down. The difference between a 40F and a 30F is 3 oz, and another 3 oz for a 20F (wide, regular length, 850 down Revelation). I haven't used my 20F on warmer nights (40s-50s), but at 20oz it is still lighter than my synthetic 32F bag (which is only good to maybe 55). I have no affiliation with EE, but y'know how excited you get when you find a really great product - suddenly everyone needs to know about it and everyone should get one! (Just like HPG or FN and weightlifting... Maybe I'm just easily excitable?) - J
 
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1/10/2017 11:41 AM
 
I'll be very interested in Scot's review of his Montbell--I'm not able to locate the thread, though. As for durability, I think you're right to think that they seem to go for weight/compressibility rather than "bomber" materials--I've not had any problems with using the bag in a standard backpacking scenario with tent and pad, but your AO and usage could be more challenging. FWIW, I actually went from a TNF synthetic to a Montbell down bag just to take advantage of the latter's compressed size--not much bigger than a Nalgene--but a cold night might have me wishing for the ol' beach ball.
 
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1/10/2017 12:47 PM
 
scothill wrote:
People love or hate wiggys. Their bags are known for being bombproof, but heavy and not compact. Lots of arguement over whether they are accurate to weight or not.


 

I just bought a 20F Wiggys, the small size.  I'm 5'8"/170# and it fits me.  Anyone  5'10" or taller would need the longer version and most anyone reading this would need the wider version.  Mine weighed 3# 10oz and its MARPAT so that is likely a couple of ounces heavier than a solid color.    Wiggy states his bags can be stored stuffed with no loss of loft.  The fact that he's had a contract for vacuum packing the sleeping bags that go into ejection seats makes me believe his claim.  We shall see.

For hiking, I'd buy a Cat's Meow and call it good, unless North Face has cheaped out on them.  They used to be good bags,  but I've heard nothing good about that company lately.

 
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1/10/2017 12:58 PM
 
Thread title is something like down bags needing a warm pad

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
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1/10/2017 1:25 PM
 
Found it, Scot--thanks! A lot of good info in that thread, though being similarly broad as you are, I've also had the experience of constrained choices and/or sticker shock. FWIW, speaking of pads, I've picked up an Exped Downmat 9 and want to see how low I can go with the Montbell 30-degree bag and Woobie in hopes a modular system might make more sense here in the Southern Appalachias--have to break out the old Dana Astral-plane to carry it all, though!
 
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1/12/2017 7:25 AM
 
My North Face Lynx works great wor this temperature, but it's old version with climashield inside, now they using something another in this bag.
Also, in this weather, like all another (unless rainy nights) sometimes I like to sleep just near the flame, using small tent behind me to reflect the flame warm.
We doing it in Siberia up to about -28F.)
 
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1/12/2017 7:29 AM
 
The Lynx is very light and can be compressed closely up to rugby ball size.
 
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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneral45-50º F "Wide" sleeping bags?45-50º F "Wide" sleeping bags?