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2/10/2012 1:32 PM
 

 Would you recommend using a waterproofing spray on this material at the seams at least? Or would it be detrimental to the thread and material?

Thanks

T

 
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2/10/2012 4:14 PM
 

I don't think it would be detrimental, but I wouldn't mess with it myself either.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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3/20/2012 5:45 PM
 

 I gave my mountain serape a somewhat ironic, but nevertheless informative water resistance test the other morning. I had gotten off work at about 3:30am, and was about 5 minutes away from REI. It just so happened that they were having a used gear sale, so I went to wait in line. Luckily I had my serape in the car, so I draped it over myself poncho style, sat down in my crazy creek chair, and took a snooze. About 10 minutes later I woke up in a slight drizzle, which continued for probably another 10-15 minutes. The rain really wasn't hard, so I am by no means calling the serape waterPROOF, however it didn't wet out, and the water beaded up on the surface really well. I was able to periodically shake the beads off. All the while, I was toasty warm and out of the wind. I want to say it was about 36-40 degrees.

 
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3/21/2012 11:05 AM
 

I could really use a Serape about now. Spring in western Oregon...... 5" of snow and still going. We usually don't get 5" over the whole winter let alone all at once this late. All of the trees with blossoms are toast. I lost the big tree in my back yard part on the fence, part on the garage and fortunately the part over the house is still up, hope it stays! A MS is on my list.

 
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4/30/2012 8:54 AM
 

This may be a subjective question, especially since most may not be familiar with what I already have. I've been on the fence for the MS for a little while and a colleague of mine even has one that I've been able to check out but not really "field test".  There has to be some kind of a formula that manuacturers use as an industry standard for coming up with a bags "temperature rating" isn't there?  Currently I have an old sleeping bag sold by ecotat to the Marine Corps in the mid 90's but after some investigation was made by Wiggys. There are links to the model but for some reason I can't copy and paste?? It can be found at www.Combatreform.org/ectotatsystems . I think I have the "patrol" model".

Anyway, its listed as a 40degree bag and I'd say thats close to accurate.  I've had it in the teens with multiple base layers and a woobie while swinging in a hammock and felt good but last week had it in only about 30 with no insulating layers and eventually (after a few stubborn cold hours) a woobie and struggled to keep my feet and some of my body warm... also with a hammock but with more wind which is where I think I lost most of the heat without sleeping on a pad.  Its got an open bottom that can be cinced shut and a hole for wear as a poncho (but no hood).  I'd estimate its about 4 lbs which is more than the MS as i read it, but being a BDA (big dumb animal) that can pack 80 lbs or so with indifference I'm not sure I'd notice the difference. Not being an insulation or fabrics ninja I'm not sure what the difference is between the primaloft in the MS or the lamilite in this bag, and when I looked it up all I saw was Venom from the wiggys owners towards polarguard or primaloft or any other fill... I know I'll get a straight answer here if anyone knows it.

I was hoping for an accurate temperature rating for the MS, or at least measured against whatever the magic 8 ball that the industry uses... I'm not sure if it would provide me with anything significant over what I've already got, but I've loved everything else I've picked up... I'm trying to overcome my fanboyism and enthusiasm for a company conducted morally and ethically with sheer logic and my wallet (sounds easy but its not).  Thanks in advance.

 

 
New Post
4/30/2012 9:05 AM
 

 The industry standard test for determining a sleeping bag rating is normally quite expensive and requires setting up sensored mannequins to simulate a human body dressed in typical clothing layer and measuring heat loss. I doubt you'll see a Mountain Serape rating test like that done any time soon. Most smaller or cottage gear manufacturing companies these days determine a comfort rating based on customer feedback and field testing (i.e. sleep outside with it until you get cold), which in my experience has been more accurate than the standardized rating system in any case.

Personally, I slept with my Mountain Serape on the ground and in a hammock in a variety of temps and I would say that the lower limit of comfort for me would be around 40-45º, assuming I was dressed appropriately (dry baselayer) and have adequate shelter from the elements. Others have mentioned that they feel the M.S. adds about 30º to the rating of a sleeping bag when used as an overbag, and Kevin_T did some testing with sensors that backs this up by observing a roughly 30º differential between outside air and between the M.S. and sleeping bag. Hope that helps some!

 

 
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4/30/2012 9:28 AM
 

J,

  Thanks, thats about what I thought I'd hear, but I didn't realize the arduous process of testing though it makes sense. Like I said, I think I have something that is 70% of what the MS is and heavier and trying to justify the purchase.

 
New Post
4/30/2012 9:30 AM
 

I think the "gain" way of describing the warmth of something makes a lot more sense. As in, the MS is good for a 20-30 degree gain.

Think about that whole "comfortable down to" thing... I regulate the temperature of our house down to about 58 degrees at night. That's the temperature I'm used to sleeping in and if it is much hotter than about 62 I have a hard time sleeping well. Contrast that with a guy living further south who never sees a household temperature under 70, let alone under 60. Do you think we're both going to have the same idea of what kind of temperature we're trying to regulate our sleep system to? Let's say it is 40 outside. My target comfort temp is 60, and somebody else's is 70. I only need 20 degrees worth of gain, but he needs 30 degrees worth of gain.

The nice thing about gain is that it is much easier to determine empirically with thermometers.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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4/30/2012 9:33 AM
 

oh, a couple of other things to mention -

continuous filament insulations (like climashield and lamilite) are more durable, but not quite as warm per weight. Non-continuous filament insulations like primaloft aren't quite as durable but are warmer per weight. When it comes to synthetic insulations, pick your poison. It's all about trapping dead air. There is really no free lunch or miracle insulation that is substantially better than the others so far as I know. Shell materials are a different matter.

and, we've now got a good looking production sample from a US facility so we're one solid step closer to having these back in stock, but made in the USA.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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4/30/2012 10:02 AM
 

Great news, and if I had my way my house would sleep at 58 too... but I've got a wife with a cold black hole where her heart used to be and two little girls that refuse to sleep with covers on... Just kidding about the wife (just in case she ever finds this forum).  Cheers.  Thanks for all the good info!

 

 
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5/30/2012 11:01 PM
 

Has there been any update on the Mountain Serape production. In particular, the versions in Multicam or Ranger Green.  Do you anticpate any preordering of the Serapes or waitng list?  I have some projects and classes coming up in late August and the Serape would be perfect for them, if that is a possibility.

Thanks for the update and the great products.

cheers,

BadBob

 
New Post
5/30/2012 11:52 PM
 

Bob,

Check your emails.  I responded there as I saw your email before this post.

Thanks,

Joe


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New Post
6/5/2012 8:26 PM
 

BadBob wrote

Has there been any update on the Mountain Serape production.

Do you anticpate any preordering of the Serapes or waitng list?

Thanks for the update and the great products.

cheers,

BadBob

 

DOH!!! thought you had some in brown. I was wrong :(

So as I read... it will be around July for more serape's?

I would really like one in brown. I guess I will just get the recon bag and compression kit for now.

I have also linked up with yall on facebook so I will keep an eye out.

Thanks.

HB

 
New Post
6/5/2012 10:36 PM
 

HB,

Green and Multicam are on the way.  Not sure of a hard date, but should be soon.  Wish I could tell you more, but I don't even know.

Joe


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New Post
6/25/2012 10:28 AM
 

I am looking for recommedations on the best compression sack for the Serape.- George

 
New Post
6/25/2012 11:16 AM
 

If you can hold on a few weeks, we will be selling a silnylon stuff sack that is sized to be carried vertically on the back of the Tara for overflow of light and bulky stuff. It will fit at least a Serape, but probably a little bit more than that as well.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
6/25/2012 11:27 AM
 

 Hi evan

 

The stuff sack you mentioned? Will it have a compression system aswel or is going to be a plain styled one?

 
New Post
6/25/2012 11:38 AM
 

Plain. It is designed to go under compression straps. No need for extra foofora hanging off of it. Oval in cross section to lay nice and flat on the back of the Tara. A simple grab handle coming out of the seam to pass the compression straps through so it doesn't slip out the bottom as you are running or whatever. Two other stuff sacks as well - one sized for the bottom of the Tara, one bedroll sized for the top of a pack. I'm a big believer that stuff sacks need to be sized and shaped to go with the pack you are putting them on, rather than sized to a specific product to put in them. More versatile and performs better. That's why the Mountain Serape isn't sold with a stuff sack -- remove that cost and let you pick a stuff sack the right size and shape for where you habitually stow it.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
6/25/2012 12:06 PM
 

Evan, that is very cool... looking forward to seeing the stuff sack options. I've found the Tarahumara is *just* big enough for a 2 night trip for me if I pack judiciously, but I do end up having to strap my sleeping insulation underneath the bottom and a jacket or two under the compression straps. That waterproof stuff sack under the compression straps flat on the back of the Tara would be perfect for that. 

For a compression sack for the Mountain Serape, I use a Kifaru 3-String in Large - it's a little bit of a tight fit but it works well, and I find I can get the Kifaru compression sacks down a little smaller than others I've used. I also like that they're designed for long and skinnier versus a big round ball which is a lot harder to pack efficiently for me. I did end up substituting a slightly longer piece of paracord for the straps on the bottom of the Tara, the one included is just a couple inches too short to fit the M.S. in the compression sack.

 
New Post
6/25/2012 12:56 PM
 

Wow thanks for the heads up Evan!


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