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6/10/2016 6:20 PM
 

Got my qui-Ya in today, and I sure am happy!  This is an aptly named pack...it could probably haul a bear!  It reminds me (in a good way) of the old Lowe Alpine Vector packs we had back in the day in 10th SFG(A).....except the qui-Ya is a heckuva lot better.  All the features you need and nothing you don't...unnecessary fluff is stripped away.  This big ol' bruin is going to be great for winter loads into a camp or extended backpack trips.  I think I am going to do some old-school rucking soon, just to load it up and hump some hills!


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6/10/2016 6:40 PM
 
Ken, I'm amazed every time I throw it on. It really locks the weight in nicely. Need some cold weather so I can get it out in the woods for a multi-day trip. 
 
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6/10/2016 6:46 PM
 
OldFart wrote:
Ken, I'm amazed every time I throw it on. It really locks the weight in nicely. Need some cold weather so I can get it out in the woods for a multi-day trip. 

Yep!  Funny how a quality pack makes you want to load it up and go!


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6/22/2016 7:42 PM
 
HPG, what is your recommendation for hunting day pack with the possibility of packing out elk quarter?

 
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6/22/2016 8:54 PM
 
Bjornf16 wrote:
HPG, what is your recommendation for hunting day pack with the possibility of packing out elk quarter?

For a day trip with the intent of packing out a quarter or meat bags....Ute with a compression pocket attached, such as the Palspocket, Tarapocket, or Connor.  A lightly loaded Ute with items needed for sustainment throughout the day in the main pack bag, then the quarter compressed between the pack bag and pocket.  Or, meat bags in the main pack bag.  That would be my recommendation.


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6/22/2016 9:50 PM
 

I second the recommendation of the Ute for that purpose, and use it that way myself. For boned out quarters in a meat bag in the main pack bag closest to the body. FWIW we generally bone animals in the field using the gutless method of field dressing. Why pack 150 pounds of bones? Survival/Sustainment gear goes in a pocket or clean meat baggie in outer part of the main pack bag(away from the body) or under the compression straps. For a bone-in quarter of a big bull use the compression method described by alpendrms. Bone-in quarters from a tender heifer calf fit in the Ute nicely :)

ETA I don't know if Westy has his qui-Ya pack yet, but his way of archery elk hunting is usually to carry his overnight gear with him, follow elk all day, camp wherever dark finds him and repeat the next day.  He thinks the qui-Ya will be great for his style of hunting, which is partly patterned after that of Cameron Haynes.  When he gets one there is some shifting of gear (usually some of the overnight gear gets left at the kill site for later, or shifted to someone else :) ) for the initial pack out.  I add this here because he is very busy with a new job and probably is not checking in very often

 

 
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6/23/2016 8:54 AM
 

I'd be curious to hear why the suggestion for the hunting pack would trend toward the Ute over the qui-Ya. If they both compress down to basically the same size, not including the height, it seems that the qui-Ya would get the nod purely for the additional capacity. Is it just because the qui-Ya is overkill for day trips, or is there another factor in play for your suggestions?

 

 
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6/23/2016 9:04 AM
 
zacht wrote:

I'd be curious to hear why the suggestion for the hunting pack would trend toward the Ute over the qui-Ya. If they both compress down to basically the same size, not including the height, it seems that the qui-Ya would get the nod purely for the additional capacity. Is it just because the qui-Ya is overkill for day trips, or is there another factor in play for your suggestions?

 

Since the OP stressed using it for day trips...the Ute seemed the best choice.  The Ute can get nearly as small as an Umlindi.  The qui-Ya is quite a bit bigger.


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6/23/2016 9:10 AM
 
I agree with the Ute recommendation. The main reason being a 24” setup is going to be more convenient to hunting, easier to walk under things, easier to walk through thick brush….just a more mobile setup IMO. I have packed elk out in the Ute and it has always been plenty big enough, I put deboned meat in the main bag and my day stuff in the connor pocket.

However, I would take the qui-ya if I was planning on packing out moose. For me anyway, I would only need the extra capacity for an animal this size. Packing out a Ute full of elk meat is just about the max load I can carry out. I would really be pushing myself loading the qui-ya with this much weight, but I am dumb enough to try it. Plus, the extra load lifter height might give a little more advantage compared to the load lifter height of the Ute.

Also, keep in mind this is a recommendation for day hunting. You might see different answers when it comes to backpack hunting.

Heck, for just day hunting you could really make a nice day pack out of the Aston House and the Umlindi. But, you would lose some of the meat packing ability.
 
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6/23/2016 9:23 AM
 

zacht, great question. When I got my Ute several years ago the qui-Ya, obviously, was not available. Since I'm 6'4" tall I would like the higher lift with only a slight weight penalty. If you are hunting in really brushy country (like I used to on the west side of the Washington Cascades) the higher pack is going to hang up more. I'm one of the oldest guys (if not the oldest) participating on this forum so a Ute full of meat is about all I want to carry over rough ground for very far. If you can handle monster loads (over 100#) in rough terrain like Westy, his brother and our world class XC ski racer buddy can (or carry your overnight gear sometimes) then maybe the qui-Ya is a better choice for you. YMMV Hope this helps.

ETA:  I see the two posts above were made while I was typing.  Great minds run on the same track :)

 

 
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6/23/2016 10:35 AM
 
The reasons definitely make sense. The height of the qui-Ya was the factor that I figured would be the biggest issue for some. Hunting high country elk I don't think it would be much problem, but certainly in lower environments with dense brush I see the point about it being more likely to hang up.

I certainly wouldn't want to pack 100+ pounds in any internal, or really on any external unless I had to. So I certainly would not plan on loading a 5500 ci pack with meat unless it was absolutely necessary. Can't imagine carrying that for several miles. I guess I was thinking more along the lines of keeping the qui-Ya significantly below full capacity, even when you're packing meat out. I always like to have more room than I need, although this kind of goes against any type of minimalist thinking.

Paulgus, I've got the Umlindi and was thinking the same thing about it making a great day hunt pack. I don't think I'd ever put more than one elk quarter on/in it, even with the PB, but that would be a good first load out to get a pack frame for the rest.
 
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6/23/2016 12:59 PM
 
I hear you on not wanting to pack out more than 100# at a time. The last time I did that I was in my early 60's, didn't have to bushwhack too far to a good trail, probably less than 2 miles total.  It was a Roosevelt bull in Washington, 225# of meat plus antlers so about 240# between me and my older son who had the heavier load.  As Scot has often counseled me, "that's what sons are for" :)



With a larger volume pack less than full of meat, you'll need to take some extra steps to avoid the "bowling ball in the bottom of a sack" effect.
 
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6/23/2016 1:22 PM
 

Sounds like I am a few decades younger than you, but you're putting me to shame with some of the pack outs that it sounds like you do!

 Also, the "bowling ball in the sack" concept is my biggest concern as well. It's likely going to be the reason I end up going with a different pack all together for hunting, and then pick up a qui-Ya just for backpacking and scouting trips when I know I don't have to worry about meat. 

 

 
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6/23/2016 2:04 PM
 
zacht wrote: Also, the "bowling ball in the sack" concept is my biggest concern as well. It's likely going to be the reason I end up going with a different pack all together for hunting, and then pick up a qui-Ya just for backpacking and scouting trips when I know I don't have to worry about meat.

 

 

The only pack currently available that would be better than Ute / qui-Ya for a meat pack out would be one of the Barney's, and perhaps some of the Cabelas externals. And maybe not even then.


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6/23/2016 2:18 PM
 
What would be your suggestion for solving the bowling ball analogy? Hanging game bags from the inside loops and then compressing the pack as much as possible to eliminate any felt swing from the hanging weight?

Was thinking that using a PalsPocket on the back and compressing game bag between the two pack bags would work for a moderate load (probably one big game bag I'm guessing), although it keeps the load a bit further away from your back.
 
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6/23/2016 2:35 PM
 
One way to solve it is the game bags that you use; I like long slender game bags that keep the meet vertical. The other way is the compression system; this is where the HPG bags really shine the compression system is awesomeness. You can make layers using the compression system on the HPG packs. You could totally close off the bottom of the qui-ya if you wanted to using the compression system. Or you could simply stuff things like extra clothes in the bottom of the bag to get the meat higher. As long as you take your time loading the meat and getting it in the right spot with the right amount of compression it all comes together pretty easily. I do not hesitate to take the pack off if I notice meat has moved around into a position that I am not happy with. It takes very little time to re-arrange thins to get them in the right position.
 
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6/23/2016 3:55 PM
 

zacht, you are on the right track. 

Thanks for the compliment.  I'm not "normal" in a number of respects, as those who know me will attest :)

Lots of good info from Paulgus and Evan.

One area where the internal frames (Ute/qui-Ya) really shine compared to external frame packs is in stability/balance when one is off trail or in snow. The Ute stays close to my back and carries very nicely.  Also, you don't have to take out a whole quarter on the first trip.  Before the current generation of packs we would be using hunting packs of about 2000 cubic inches (which didn't have nearly the load bearing capacity of the HPG line) and take out 20-30 pounds each on the first trip.  Then we (usually two of us) would go back with the big packs for the rest of the meat.  HTH

 

 
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6/23/2016 8:28 PM
 
Thanks for the input.

I've been using Umlindi in previous years hunting elk as we were hunting in an area where we could drag the carcass out. Not this year; had to change hunting areas since I didn't draw in our usual hunting area and also had to move the season to archery.

I've not had to pack out quarters before. I've been looking at boneless method as preferred method. I was concerned about the height of qui-Ya pack since I'm 5'-9"

Björn
 
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6/30/2016 11:02 PM
 
I know it's a bit of a strange request, but would someone who has a qui-Ya be willing to post a couple pics showing the pack in compressed mode? Looking to see how small it gets with little or no load inside.
Thanks
 
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7/1/2016 7:44 PM
 

A Foliage/Manatee qui-Ya is headed my way!

 

 

 

 
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