Hill People Gear | Real Use Gear For Backcountry Travelers
888.464.1875 | info@hillpeoplegear.com Register | Login
What We Do

There is a bewildering array of outdoor gear you can choose from in this day and age, with REI and EMS being almost as common as 7-elevens. However, the popularity of outdoor pursuits have pushed a lot of gear design in the direction of fashion rather than function. "Fast and Light" is just as much of a fashion imperative now as the neon clothing colors were a few years ago. In some cases there is real function there, and in some cases not.

At Hill People Gear, our focus is timeless designs that solve unsolved problems using the best advantages of modern materials. We think in terms of what will work for someone living close to the land day in and day out over a period of time. Some of our products will appeal to hunters, some of them will appeal to soldiers, and some of them will appeal to folks who are looking for simple, functional, and reliable gear. Most of all, we'd like to think that our gear would be the first choice of our "Hill People" forebearers if they were around today.

Hill People Gear is a small family owned company located in Western Colorado. Unless otherwise specified, all products are made in America out of American materials. This means when you spend your hard earned money with HPG, you are helping support American jobs and American families. Yes, the purchase price is higher than products manufactured out of foreign materials in foreign countries, but when you look at the bigger picture, the cost is less. 

Evan Hill

Evan Hill

Evan grew up in the west, including tenures in Colorado, Alaska, Washington, New Mexico, and West Texas. Always on the edge of town, always outdoors. He started sewing using his mom's machine when he was 12. Early on, he sewed a pack that included a side panel design that came out on a Lowe pack the following year. Since the Lowe brothers were heroes of his, Evan was gratifed. His early outdoor resume is rounded out with numerous outdoor adventures both inside and outside of the Boy Scouts, culminating in the rank of Eagle Scout.

Evan went on to major in Anthropology while serving as a forest fire fighter on the Wyoming Hotshots in the summer. After college, he spent over a decade involved in web and software design and architecture in the dot.coms of Seattle. After a welcome return to the land in the form of moving his family to central Oregon, Evan turned the design and engineering skills he had honed in the dot.coms back to a problem area much nearer and dearer to his heart.

Scot Hill

Scot Hill, Operations and Finance

Scot grew up alongside Evan across the American west, and also achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. He parlayed his Boy Scout experience into 5 seasons with the Forest Service as a trail crew member and wilderness ranger. Scot worked in the San Juans of southern Colorado and the Gila of southern New Mexico performing a wide gammut of duties including horseback patrol, horse packing, trail construction and maintenance, fire fighting, sawyer / feller, and gear buying.

On the San Juan, Scot was very involved in Leave No Trace instruction and wilderness preservation. He gained some notoriety with his hard line stance about not using helicopters to evacuate people from wilderness areas who didn't have life threatening injuries. Above all, Scot spent months on end traveling and living in the back country during his tenure with the Forest Service.

Today, Scot is an environmental consultant and master of the "why can't you design a piece of gear that does such and such" question.

Brooke Edwards

Brooke Edwards

Brooke is a Western Colorado native, although she also lived in Alaska at the same time Scot and Evan did. She grew up outdoors alongside her gunsmith father and married a lifelong hunter and outdoorsman. They have two active boys that they are out in the woods with almost every weekend.

Brooke likes fishing and nature photography best, but pitches in when it's time to cut and wrap wild game. She brings nine years of small business and shipping experience to her current role as a shipper at HPG.

www.flickr.com
Edward Curtis Canyon De Chelly
When humans first set foot in a new continent, they came in small groups under their own power, bringing only the gear they needed. Most simply called themselves The People. Over time, those who chose the rougher freer life of the up country came to think of themselves as the Hill People.
Hill People Gear