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9/25/2011 2:06 PM
 

This thread is for discussion and questions about making your own canister woodstove. Superbadger has already made one, and I hope he weighs in with his experiences and tips.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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9/25/2011 3:50 PM
 

 I just completed one of these stoves, with a few adjustments from Evan's design.

The stove is mostly the same, however the one I built uses a slightly different door design that rotates up and out of the way, as opposed to a front opening hinge. The result is mostly the same, but it was a little easier for me to construct, and may have a few less moving parts. It does a good job of sealing the front, and even allows for a little adjustable dampening.

I use a Ti Goat 3'' stove pipe, which saves a little weight

I just got it done, and have yet to really field test it, but Evan's design is field proven and I can attest that it works really, really well. I have a similar sized box style stove, and there really isn't any comparison to make. The canister stove is easy to put together, efficient, and extremely easy to get a fire going in, as well as feed once you're burning. I haven't thrown it on a scale yet, but I can guess that it also may be a bit lighter than a similar sized stainless steel box stove. 

I used mine in my Go Lite SL-4 tipi last weekend in mild temps, and it was definitely nice to be able to take the chill off in the morning and evening, dry out socks, and boil water. Wood gathering is very easy, and the thing can eat up most easily gathered squaw wood, and even smaller sized rounds.

The size of the cook surface is optimal for a small pot. I use an MSR titanium Kettle on mine, and I know Evan uses an REI .9 liter kettle, and a GSI Halulite minimalist on his (though not at the same time).

 
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9/25/2011 4:34 PM
 

Where are you guys sourcing your stove bodys? 

 
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9/25/2011 7:07 PM
 

 The body comes from Wal-Mart- it's in the kitchen section, sold as a "Large Canister" 

It comes with a glass lid that you won't need.

 
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9/25/2011 10:59 PM
 

Evan,

 

First, thank you for sharing the useful info about your stove design.  Much appreciated.

Can you provide a little more detail about your selction of hinge?

Pictures and or an item # and source would be most helpful.

Thank you, and best regards,

112Papa

 
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9/26/2011 11:10 AM
 
The Hinge I used came from Home Depot: Look up part #202066918 on their website. You'll notice in the photos that I actually trimmed away the corners of my hinge a bit. This isn't necessary, and the only real purpose it serves is to reduce a small amount of weight
 
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10/27/2011 9:33 AM
 

 I finally got around to taking some photos of the stove that I made. All the parts for the stove door were sort of "manufactured". I found 1/2'' wide by (if I remember correctly) .028'' thick stainless steel strips in the hobby section of the hardware store. I'm sure you'll find a thickness that works for you. The "hinge" side of the door uses a piece bent at a 90* and fastened to the stove body with two rivets. The part that attaches to the door uses one rivet, so that the door can swing up out of the way, using this single rivet as a pivot point. So far, it seems to work well. I used a sheet of thicker stainless for the door. It seals really well, and the pivoting of the door actually allows you to crack it slightly for more draft. The holes that I drilled don't quite offer a "full blast" draft. Rather, with the door all the way closed the stove is sort of dampened down. It worked out this way by accident, but I sort of like it. The "latch" is pretty simple to fabricate. I used two more pieces of stainless stripping, and cut two matching grooves in them, so that they mate up/lock. I finished it off with a stainless cable handle. Hope these photos help

 
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10/27/2011 10:07 AM
 

I'm digging it Badger. I wonder if a door like this with fewer holes or no holes in it might be the way to go for infinitely adjustable and effective dampening? Basically you'd only want enough holes in the door to provide "fully closed damper" airflow. Look forward to seeing how this exact arrangement works out over time in use. I might re-do my door to this style. The only downside that I see is that it might be a little easier to get into my stove when it is still in its stuff sack to pull the food bag out. Seems worth the trade off though.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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11/23/2011 10:24 PM
 

 I'll have to use it more to decide, but I may have gotten lucky on the holes. It provides a pretty dampened burn when the door is close, but by cracking it just a bit you can get a nice draft going. The holes are nice and low, so the airflow flows nicely through the coles, same with the door cracked. 

Another potential frustration with my door design might be the need to remove the pot to open the door. Haven't used it enough to decide if this is a big deal.....

 
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2/23/2012 8:59 AM
 

Thanks for the ideas for making a canister woodstove I "finished" mine this evening.  I am contempalting removing the legs and using althread for the legs instead.  I am going to do a test burn tomorrow and decide howmany more holes I am wanting to drill.  I am also undecided on if I want to bend the top or leave it round or rivet on some pieces for a cook surface here are the pics.  the hing allows the door to drop some that is why I added an L shaped piece to the back of the door.  

[IMG]http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x13/AlaskaJohn9/stove1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x13/AlaskaJohn9/stove2.jpg[/IMG]

 


forumPoster is not the actual poster. If you are the actual poster, please make another quick post claiming this post. Sorry, too much moderator overhead to change the attribution on this post.
 
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2/24/2012 1:42 PM
 

The above post was mine.  I fired it up last night to do a test burn see how I like the legs and door latch etc.  Here are the pics :


 
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2/27/2012 10:25 PM
 

Does anyone know the dimensions of large can at walmart?

Also it not needed to have some sort of grate in the bottom for ventalation? I see a grate cut to size lying to the side in one of the pics on the link but I wasnt sure if that is needed?

 
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2/28/2012 9:41 PM
 

I'd also like to know the canister dimensions.

I've got two 4" roll-up stove pipes already------for the Paratipi and 4man-------so I'm trying to decide the best firebox size to efficiently use one or both of those pipes rather than ordering a 3" pipe from Ti Goat.  Right now I'm considering welding up a 9x9x12" box stove, but am not sure if that's enough different from the canister stove to warrant the effort and expense.

 
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2/28/2012 10:49 PM
 
I believe it is right around 6 (diameter) x9 they have another one that is 7 (diameter) x 6 I am thinking of a way to mate two of the wider ones together to have a 7x12 but be able to break them back down
 
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2/29/2012 7:19 AM
 

Walmart has 3 sizes of these. the middle size which we've been using is 6x9". Due to the construction of my personal pipe inset, I can run whatever diameter pipe. I've run a 4" pipe a number of times. Works just fine. Even a stove this small benefits from a 4" pipe.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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2/29/2012 5:46 PM
 

Question... Im just starting this project, I really want to be able to pack the stove pipe up in the can.. has anyone tried this? My idea was to cut several 8 inch lengths of pipe and stack them on top of each other so i can fit them into the can? I wanted to go up just two feet and then out 16 inches so I would need 5 or 6 8 inch length and getting them to stack one on top of the other will be tricky. Any have a better suggestion?

How are you guys packing in the stove pipes? Seems like a terrible thing to have lashed to a pack. Teach me my friends.

 
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2/29/2012 5:59 PM
 

Sorry im a reall rookie, appreciate any feedback...

Will either of these things work to make a stove pipe or will it burn right up?

Aluminim vent pipe: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100145866/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=aluminum vent pipe&storeId=10051

This might be straight crazy but, flexable dryer duct piping: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100050673/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=dryer duct&storeId=10051

 
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2/29/2012 6:27 PM
 

You haven't seen a roll up stove pipe. I haven't been able to discover who came up with this. Jason maintains it was the Russians, and he could well be right. At any rate, it is by far the best answer.

Basically, it is a single piece of stainless or titanium foil that rolls up lengthwise to form a one piece stovepipe, or widthwise for carrying. Rolled up widthwise, even a 10 foot pipe is no bigger than the inside of a paper towel roll. Then you put wire cable rings around the outside for the pipe to keep its set when it is lengthwise as a stovepipe. If you want a really light but expensive pipe out of titanium, get yourself set up at seekoutside. If you want a heavier but considerably less expensive pipe out of stainless, get yourself set up at tiGoat. (that's the only thing I'll buy from tiGoat, btw). So far, I've ended up choosing stainless each time. My really short pipe isn't enough of a weight savings in ti to justify the extra expense, and my really long one would be so expensive in ti that I wasn't willing to do it. A mid-size pipe might well be in that sweet spot where ti isn't too expensive, but the pipe is long enough that it offers a big weight savings. You want the biggest diameter pipe you can get. I think that means 3" in the case of both seekoutside and tigoat.


We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
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2/29/2012 10:11 PM
 

 Wow thats great. Thanks. Sorry probably obvious to others. The stainless is pretty affordable.

So for a six foot pipe I will get two end pieces but how many of those cable retainers would you recommend?

Also one thing that sucks in my opnion is that the roll of pipe stove material will be 12 inches long, just a few inches two long to fit inside the walmart can I have put legs on. Well what do ya do aye?

 

 
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3/1/2012 8:03 AM
 

I would go one ring per foot of pipe.


http://www.edtsbackcountry.com/ | sig added by EH. go check out Ed's stuff!
 
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HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralMake your own canister woodstoveMake your own canister woodstove


Edward Curtis Canyon De Chelly
When humans first set foot in a new continent, they came in small groups under their own power, bringing only the gear they needed. Most simply called themselves The People. Over time, those who chose the rougher freer life of the up country came to think of themselves as the Hill People.
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