Hill People Gear Forums
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralHillebergHilleberg
Previous
 
Next
New Post
9/27/2015 5:39 PM
 

I have been considering purchasing a new 4 season shelter for 2-3 person use. I have been using a Go-Lite shangri-la 4 for some time, but I find that it's too cramped for 2 people in the winter, and the sloping sides really cut into the useable floor space. 

I am considering getting a semi-free standing shelter such as the Hilleberg Nallo 4GT, as I believe the tubular design and more vertical walls would give a bit more space inside. Also, when I need to have the option of a floored shelter (car camping with my girlfriend, bugs, etc) I can use the removable inner tent, making it a bit more versatile. 

Does anyone have any experience with these shelters? I am thinking the 4 person with GT vestibule could be nicely modified to take a wood stove, and may give plenty of room for sitting inside, although not standing. 

I read a review here that seemed to be favorable, and had some pretty promising weight specs (w/o the inner tent, of course)

 
New Post
9/28/2015 12:09 PM
 

I can't offer any Hilleberg advice, but I find it interesting that you find an SL4 cramped with two guys and a stove, as that is the high-country standard hot tent for many.  I've never used one myself, I've only used the SL3 and it is too cramped for two and a stove, though its ideal for one and a stove, IMO.

I'd be inclined to suggest a Seek Outside 6-man with a nest for what you've described, unless it includes a lot of time above timberline.

 
New Post
9/29/2015 12:21 PM
 
In the SL4, it is very difficult to arrange it so that two people can sit up in their beds without their heads being into the walls if a stove is in place. Laying down, plenty of space. Sitting up, not so much.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
9/29/2015 5:04 PM
 
evanhill wrote:
In the SL4, it is very difficult to arrange it so that two people can sit up in their beds without their heads being into the walls if a stove is in place. Laying down, plenty of space. Sitting up, not so much.

 

I should have elaborated more, as this is my main issue, and an important scenario in the winter. I am hoping the more vertical sidewalls of a hoop shelter will allow for sitting up, and also allow for the stove in floorless mode.

 
New Post
9/29/2015 6:08 PM
 
Hey Pat, have you looked at either of these as an alternative?

http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hoop-dreams-4-OU9622.html?cgid=equipment-tents&dwvar_OU9622_variationColor=314#start=0

http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hoopla-4-OU9615.html?cgid=equipment-tents&dwvar_OU9615_variationColor=304

----------------------------------------------------------------------- Excuse me while I whip this out.
 
New Post
10/1/2015 11:34 PM
 
JoeHayes wrote:
Hey Pat, have you looked at either of these as an alternative?

http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hoop-dreams-4-OU9622.html?cgid=equipment-tents&dwvar_OU9622_variationColor=314#start=0

http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hoopla-4-OU9615.html?cgid=equipment-tents&dwvar_OU9615_variationColor=304

 

While one of the coolest tent designs around they are TINY in person. I'll grab one if I stumble across a good deal but they are almost a third smaller then an SL5. Wish they would make some of their other designs/sizes:  Nomadic Comfort LLC

ETA: nevermind, just saw the square footage on the Hille, maybe the MH isn't so small. 

 
New Post
12/21/2015 6:03 AM
 
I took my girlfriend winter camping this last weekend and we stayed in the SL4. With two people and a dog, it was definitely more cramped than I would like- particularly because I was using the HPG shepherd stove. We both had a great time though, but I was left wishing I had a larger shelter, or at least one that was more space-efficient.

I realized a couple of things that I hadn't articulated in my original post. Firstly, what I love about the SL4 is ease of pitching. Pull out the 4 corners, stake, and you're mostly there. You can make use of additional guy-outs for added strength and stability, but for all intents and purposes, you're up and running with just 4 corners- no "set backs", no messing around. Second, It seems as though most tipi-style shelters encounter the problem of sagging. I always have a nice tight pitch to begin with, only to have the material sag throughout use. I have seen this with a number of different shelters from different manufacturers. They start out drum tight, but end up saggy.

My goal in exploring something like the Hilleberg Nallo 4 GT is to increase useable space near the edges, take advantage of easy pitching, and have a nice tight squared away shelter with room for 2+ in the winter.

My quest may eventually lead me to a 6+ person tipi, but I want to explore other options. I have spent plenty of time in tipis of various sizes, and they make remarkable shelters. I think they are best in the 6-12 man size.

 

Joe- That MH shelter looks interesting, it would certainly go a long way toward getting more useable space out of the shelter. I may explore that.

Fowler- That outfit looks like they have some awesome designs. Did they license their design to MH? Have you found anywhere to buy those shelters?

 
New Post
12/21/2015 12:08 PM
 
SuperBadger wrote:


I realized a couple of things that I hadn't articulated in my original post. Firstly, what I love about the SL4 is ease of pitching. Pull out the 4 corners, stake, and you're mostly there. You can make use of additional guy-outs for added strength and stability, but for all intents and purposes, you're up and running with just 4 corners- no "set backs", no messing around. Second, It seems as though most tipi-style shelters encounter the problem of sagging. I always have a nice tight pitch to begin with, only to have the material sag throughout use. I have seen this with a number of different shelters from different manufacturers. They start out drum tight, but end up saggy.

 The sagging is just the nature of silnylon.  Push the pole up a click.  The SL3 hex is similarly easy to pitch, the pole itself measures the placement of each stake.    I never understood the Kifaru "setback" silliness.  Seek Outside tipis all stake out in a circle.

 
New Post
12/21/2015 3:14 PM
 
The quickest and best way I found to pitch the SO 6 man is with the use of setbacks. One for the door ends (5 stake lengths), one for the sides (6"). After that, just taut. The tension thing is a property of silnylon, but one way it gets fixed is with shock corded hoops. The silnylon Utopias stay tensioned, as does the floored one we've got from GoLite whose name I forget. I've gotta say - I prefer floorless, and I think tipis have their applications and strong points. However, I prefer free-standing for most of my uses.

We are fortunate in this matter that your conduct will be your marker and, thus, your reputation. The conduct of others on this forum has been, and will continue to be, their marker, and thus, their reputation. In the west, a person invests in one's reputation carefully. - 112Papa
 
New Post
12/22/2015 9:22 AM
 
I think the concept of a free standing floorless shelter is pretty spot on.
That was the impetus for me looking toward a Hilleberg shelter. They aren't truly freestanding, but take the advantages from free standing shelters. I've got to see if I can actually see one in person.
 
New Post
12/22/2015 9:35 AM
 
The more I use the tipi, the more I start thinking of a free-standing shelter. I have been using a floorless, center pole shelter for about 10 years now. I also have a golite utopia. I hate the foot entry, but otherwise like it a lot. Especially around here in sand and snow. Getting a good pitch in OR was easier it seems, but here rock is often at a shallow depth so having the stakes in tight can become an exercise in frustration. I have purposely not look to hard at alternatives as I have multiple shelters now.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear "If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston
 
New Post
12/22/2015 4:17 PM
 
SuperBadger wrote:

Joe- That MH shelter looks interesting, it would certainly go a long way toward getting more useable space out of the shelter. I may explore that.

Fowler- That outfit looks like they have some awesome designs. Did they license their design to MH? Have you found anywhere to buy those shelters?

 

Correct, MH licenses the design, I assume exclusively as I haven't seen any of those other shelters commercially available. Other then snowload situations (or maybe extreme wind) I would think a  7' ish version of the hoop tent (so standing height all the way to the edge of the hoop) would have a pretty big advantage over a traditional single pole. Seems to bridge the gap between tipi and wall tent much better then bell tents, which is the only other shelter I can think of that tries to do this.

the only downsides I've read is that inserting the hoop can be fussy and the hoop seam can be hard to seal completely. I do hope that company gets more of their designs on the market, they look pretty rad to me.

 
New Post
12/22/2015 6:06 PM
 
Fowler wrote: Other then snowload situations (or maybe extreme wind) I would think a  7' ish version of the hoop tent (so standing height all the way to the edge of the hoop) would have a pretty big advantage over a traditional single pole. Seems to bridge the gap between tipi and wall tent much better then bell tents, which is the only other shelter I can think of that tries to do this.

the only downsides I've read is that inserting the hoop can be fussy and the hoop seam can be hard to seal completely. I do hope that company gets more of their designs on the market, they look pretty rad to me.

 I dunno about that one.  I think I'd stick with the tipi unless I was going to step up to a proper camping yurt, which in fact I have plans to do

 
New Post
12/25/2015 9:35 AM
 
I think the smallest tipi I would go with is something like the Seek Outside 6 man. I don't think there is any type of free-standing shelter that offers as much space for the weight. Take-a-knee: Camping yurt sounds pretty cool. I only have experience with the semi-permanent style, which of course are pretty damn nice to live in. Maybe you're talking about the same thing? Vertical walls!
 
New Post
12/25/2015 12:23 PM
 
SuperBadger wrote:
. Take-a-knee: Camping yurt sounds pretty cool. I only have experience with the semi-permanent style, which of course are pretty damn nice to live in. Maybe you're talking about the same thing? Vertical walls!

 
This is one brand from the west coast:

http://www.campingyurts.com/

There is a similar product from NY and several from the Southern Highlands.  I have some carpentry/cabinet making skills and will probably just buy the canvas and possibly the roof ring.  For portability some designs use a round laminated or steam bent roof ring to save weight.  A yurt fills the same niche as a wall tent, but is, IMO, a superior design.  I'm pondering getting one to live in while I build my next house.  One company even makes a yurt cover out of translucent greenhouse fabric.  A portable greenhouse.

 
New Post
12/26/2015 2:44 AM
 
I've got tipis and several tents, but in my general area where there's no creepy crawlies I'm an tarp guy. For some time I've been out of the loop as to what's available out there. However there has been one tent out there for multiple folks that's intrigue me and it's the MSR Backcountry Barn. It's got an lot of usable space and can run with or without floor. Near an vehicle it looks like an interesting option. Downside is the price.
 
New Post
12/27/2015 9:02 AM
 
That's an interesting shelter- definitely pricey. I wonder how it would hold up in the wind? I could see it being a cool group-tent, in the snow with the center cut out and two "benches" along the walls.

I am taking my SL-4 out again tomorrow for a couple nights. I am going to hopefully take some photos and really think objectively about it.
 
New Post
1/12/2016 9:02 PM
 

Patrick,

If you are still in the market for a 4 season shelter, I'd encourage you to look no further than Hilleberg. They are unquestionably the most well thought out and best constructed shelters I've ever seen/used. The attention to detail throughout is truly something to behold...and be thankful for when the elements are trying their damnedest to rip you off a mountainside. Of course this comes at a price, both in terms of weight penalty and stacks of greenbacks, but those aspects are largely negated when one considers all the other "stuff" you'd buy and tote along to make up the difference in any real or perceived comparative deficiencies in a lesser shelter. You can always get in better shape for the former and save more for the latter. :)

Regards,

Allen

P.S. - Hope you are doing well! If you ever get up this way I've got a bunch of components/reloads you could ferry down to Scot & Evan.

 
New Post
1/23/2016 4:35 PM
 
I can say as a Hilleberg Junkie that you never feel it was too heavy to pack or too expensive when you are inside your Hilleberg of choice while the weather is nasty.
 
New Post
2/11/2016 9:29 AM
 

Thanks for chiming in Allen! Which shelter do you have? I have mainly been looking at the Nallo series, because they seem to offer a good balance of durability and weight, with the ability to be pitched floorless (lighter weight) and possibly modified for wood stove use.

I'll definitely let you know if I am up that way! I am sure the Hill Bro's would appreciate it!

 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeDiscussionsDiscussionsGeneralGeneralHillebergHilleberg